These 3 Photographers Reveal the Odd Art of Organizing Your Food

There’s something calming and gratifying about objects sorted and organized – a human neurological quirk that’s made its way into affinity groups and bestseller lists, and is shared by many of us here at Mylio (and, we suspect, by you too). The three creatives below are definitely on board with organizing, with three takes on food still lifes that are both fun and satisfying. What must their dinner plates have looked like growing up? Links will jump you down the page: Lernert & Sande: Cubes Sam Kaplan: Pyramids Unwrapped Brittany Wright: Food Gradients Lernert & Sande When the Dutch newspaper De Volkskrant wanted an arresting image for their special photo documentary project about food, they reached out to artists Lernert & Sande. The duo’s finished effort: nearly 100 perfect 1 x 1 x 1-inch raw, comestible cubes. You can buy prints of the work here. And for those of you who don’t think the image is quite organized enough, take heart: one obsessive netizen has — wait for it — assiduously labeled each of the cubes. Via boredpada. Sam Kaplan New York-based commercial photographer Sam Kaplan shoots plenty of assignments for clients, but his Pyramids Unwrapped project was a personal effort, reflecting… Continue reading These 3 Photographers Reveal the Odd Art of Organizing Your Food

Organizing EVERYthing in Your Life Would Look Like This

Conceptual artist Rachel Perry started her art career late in life, when she was already a working mother, and so gravitated naturally to working with whatever found and collected objects she had at hand. Perry’s Lost In My Life project is in many ways a culmination of this magpie instinct, illustrating the sheer volume of material our homes accumulate simply through daily living, their subtle accretion over time, and how organizing them reveals their true burden on us. Recently I’ve been pirating my own work to make new projects, turning sculptures created as discrete works into set-ups in the photography studio. Literally absorbed in my work, “Lost in My Life” references the endless organizing, cleaning and shopping that form the business of living. — Rachel Perry It’s been pointed out that much of the detritus Perry collects for these pieces – twist ties, takeout containers, bread tags – are designed to preserve things, yet end up burying and obscuring her instead. What would our own streams of consumption, painstakingly collected and organized, look like? Rachel Perry’s collaborated with Vogue, the New York Times, and oddly, Johnson & Johnson; be sure and scroll to the bottom of this page for a video… Continue reading Organizing EVERYthing in Your Life Would Look Like This

15 Deceptively Sweet Portraits of Kids Surrounded by What They Eat

You may or may not be fed up with tired of the endless carousel of Instagram food posts (because really, y’all, how many pictures of just-so lattes and bowls of berries can one civilization consume?) — but the fact remains that photos are great tools for documenting what goes into our bodies. And in the hands of the right artist, photos are especially useful for exploring how what we eat relates to bigger concepts of health, culture, and sustainability. For example: we’ve featured Henry Hargreaves’ mashup of electronics consumer culture and fast food, and James Ostrer’s primal sugar-fiend fetishes. And for insight into how we relate to our immediate environment, we’ve seen Paula Zuccotti’s oddly satisfying catalogues of every personal item people touch in a day. Here, with his Daily Bread series, Gregg Segal takes a similarly bean-county approach to Zuccotti’s: everything kids eat in a week, at a glance. I began to look more deeply at food – what we’re eating and throwing away. The conversation about what we should and shouldn’t be eating is growing louder, but how much – if at all – are our diets changing? To find out, I’m asking kids to keep a journal of everything… Continue reading 15 Deceptively Sweet Portraits of Kids Surrounded by What They Eat

Mylio Version 1.8 Crushes Photo Mechanic & Lightroom

(This is an excerpt from a recent customer review. You can read the full post here.) I’m always looking for faster and faster tools to process my images and it was the quest for speed that made me look at a new program called Mylio. Mylio is a funny little name, but if you know its origin, it makes a lot of sense. Break Mylio down and it stands for My Life Organized. And getting my nearly 1 million photo library organized, faster than any program I’ve used to date, is exactly what I love about Mylio.